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Churchgoers stick around for theology, not music or preachers

By Agencies
Most churchgoers will put up with a change in music style or a different preacher.
 
But don’t mess with a church’s beliefs or there may be an exodus, according to a new study from Nashville-based LifeWay Research.
 
The study of Protestant churchgoers found most are committed to staying at their church over the long haul. But more than half say they would strongly consider leaving if the church’s beliefs changed.
 
Pastors often worry about changing church music and setting off a “worship war,” said Scott McConnell, executive director of LifeWay Research. But few say they would leave over music.
 
Churchgoers are much more concerned about their church’s beliefs.
 
“Mess with the music and people may grumble,” he said. “Mess with theology and they’re out the door.”
 
Churchgoers stay put
 
LifeWay Research surveyed 1,010 Protestant churchgoers—those who attend services at least once a month—to see how strongly they are tied to their local congregations.
 
Researchers found most churchgoers stay put.
 
Thirty-five percent have been at their church between 10 and 24 years. Twenty-seven percent have been there for 25 years or more. Twenty-one percent have been there less than five years, while 17 percent have been at the same church for between five and nine years.
 
Lutherans (52 percent), Methodists (40 percent) and Baptists (31 percent) are most likely to have been at their church for 25 years or more. Fewer nondenominational (11 percent) or Assemblies of God/Pentecostal churchgoers (13 percent) have such long tenure.
 
“Most church members have been at their church longer than their pastor,” said McConnell.
 
More than half (57 percent) of churchgoers say they are completely committed to continuing to attend their current church. About a quarter (28 percent) are “very much” committed, while 11 percent are moderately committed. Two percent are slightly committed, while 1 percent are not committed at all.
 
The more people go to church, the more committed they are to attending their same church in the future. Those who attend at least once a week are twice as likely to be completely committed to attending their church (62 percent) than people who go once or twice a month (31 percent). Those who attend once or twice a month are more likely to be moderately committed (36 percent) than those who go at least once a week (7 percent).
 
Churchgoers with evangelical beliefs are more likely to be completely committed (67 percent) than those who don’t have evangelical beliefs (45 percent). Baptists (60 percent) are more likely to be completely committed than Lutherans (47 percent).
 
About two-thirds (63 percent) of churchgoers who are 65 or older are completely committed to attending their same church in the future. That drops to 50 percent for those younger than 35.
 
Older churchgoers are also least likely to want to leave their church. When asked if they’ve thought about going to another church in their area, 92 percent of those 65 or older say no.
 
Overall, 15 percent of churchgoers say they have thought about going to another church in the past six months. Eighty-five percent say they have not.
 
Of those thinking about going to another church, about half (54 percent) have already visited another church. Forty-six percent have not.
 
“If people are thinking about leaving your church, chances are they’ve already started looking,” said McConnell. “So they’re probably halfway out the door.”
 
Most feel their beliefs line up with the church
 
For the most part, churchgoers say they agree with their church’s teaching. About half (52 percent) say their beliefs are completely aligned with those of the church. Forty-two percent say their beliefs are mostly aligned. Fewer than 3 percent say their beliefs are slightly aligned, not aligned or they don’t know their church’s beliefs.
 
Most find church programs helpful
 
Researchers also looked at how effective churches are in helping people grow spiritually.
 
Most churchgoers think their church is doing a good job. Three-quarters (76 percent) think their church has been either extremely helpful (36 percent) or very helpful (40 percent) in their spiritual growth. Sixteen percent say the church is moderately helpful.
 
Relatively few say the church has not been helpful (1 percent) in their spiritual growth or are not sure (2 percent).

Churchgoers did have some suggestions on ways churches can help them grow. Among them:

  • 27 percent want their church to help them understand more about God and the Bible.
  • 20 percent want their church to help them find new ways to serve.
  • 19 percent want their church to provide more Bible study groups.
  • 16 percent want their church to help them get to know more people in church.
  • 14 percent say their church could provide forums to answer their spiritual questions.
  • 13 percent want their church to give them more chances to serve.
  • 13 percent want their church to provide worship experiences that fit their needs.
  • 9 percent want their church to provide more interaction with the pastor.
  • 8 percent want their church to provide them with a mentor.
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Even though most churchgoers are staying put and are relatively happy, there’s some reason for concern, McConnell said.

At any given church, about 15 percent of the congregation is thinking about leaving. If they go, the church could suffer.

“The average church in the United States has less than 100 attenders,” McConnell said. “Losing 10 or 15 people could make a huge impact.”

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